The web of life – badgers, bees and bee-flies

So here is a badger foraging in my garden

It digs holes and scrapes in its search for food

And then …. a Tawny Mining Bee (Andrena fulva) excavates her nest in one of the badger scrapes – the entrance looks like a little volcano.

And this is the female Tawny Mining Bee who excavated this nest

And here she is emerging from her nest

Lurking nearby is the Dark Bordered Bee-fly (Bombylious major) which is a parasitoid i.e. it lays it egg in the burrow of the Tawny Mining Bee (and other species) – its larvae then eat the larvae of the bee

Also lurking in the nearby flower bed is Gooden’s Nomad Bee (Nomada goodeniana) – another parasitoid species, but this a bee not a fly and fortunately for the Tawny Mining Bee it lays its eggs in the nests of other Mining Bee species

And all of this happening in my back garden in Exeter over the past couple of weeks …..

My 25 favourite Dartmoor photographs of 2018

As the year comes to an end I thought I would look back at my favourite photographs that I have taken in 2018 on Dartmoor – I think they capture the spirit of the place along with the people who work there and those who enjoy it.

The day the Commons turned green after some rain and the grass started growing – the sheep and cattle go to the Common

Beating the Bounds at Gidleigh Common – Penny Warren and Crispin Alford clean the boundary stone – even the horse is paying attention

A marsh fritillary at Challacombe – a special butterfly at a very special place

Russell Ashford ‘gathering’ his sheep from Buckfastleigh West Common

This quote from James Rebanks – the Lake District hill-farmer and author of the Shepherd’s Life is very appropriate to Dartmoor as well

“Our farming way of life has roots deeper than five thousand years into the soil of this landscape. Taking my sheep down those lanes is what people have done here since the land was first settled. That is what these lanes are for, to let the little farmsteads access the mountain grazing. I am walking in the footsteps of my ancestors, and living a life they lived.”

The Reddaways ‘gathering’ their Galloways from South Tawton Common in Belstone

One man and his dog
John Jordan crossing the Teign on Gidleigh Common whilst herding his Galloways – hardcore

A little bit of soft wilding on Lydford Common

Our National Trust 10 Tors Team complete their challenge

Arms Tor across to Bray Tor

A cuckoo at Emsworthy

My friends from the Devon and Exeter Squash and Racketball Club at High Willhays

Sunset at Scorhill on the Solstice with my friend Steph

Kes Tor during the heatwave

The Tolman Stone on the Teign on Gidleigh Common with Dizzy, Nicolas and Annabelle – inappropriate footwear but all was well ….

A Highland cow near Headland Warren

A walk to Wistman’s Wood with friends

Leather Tor from Sheep’s Tor

Stand and Deliver
Widecombe Fair – The Friends of the Dartmoor Hill Ponies: the Dartmoor Hillies Warriors

Swaling on Haytor and Bagtor Common

Lunch during 10 Tors training in the rain in the Forest of Dartmoor

‘Iconic people looking after Iconic places’
Julia Aglionby Director of the Foundation for Common Land

The Gidleigh Commoners – proud people worried about their future and the condition of their Common – too much Western Gorse and Purple Moor Grass (Molinia)

Crispin Alford – a Dartmoor Commoner  who still tends his flocks and herds on horseback

Sheep gathering near Wotter – the quad bike boys

Black a Tor Copse

One of John Cooper’s Herdwicks on Okehampton Common

 

 

Gidleigh in the sunshine

Had a great 12 mile walk today  on Dartmoor today – Fernworthy Forest – Sittaford – Quinton’s Man, Watern Tor, Scorhill, Chagford Common and back to Fernworthy. By accident bumped into John Jordan herding his cattle. Love the tradition and culture of hill-farming – this time John is on a quad bike crossing the Teign at Scorhill on Gidleigh Common…. it’s a hard core life – riding quad bikes on Commons dominated by purple moor grass (Molinia) is simply dangerous… respect ..

The day the Commons came alive

Over night the Commons on Dartmoor turned green. I was at this exact spot on Thursday and the landscape was brown – a bit of rain and sunshine and the grass starts growing. A late spring but nevertheless a natural miracle. Magical Challacombe, magical Dartmoor.

When there is grass – the sheep come – I could have been standing here 900 years ago and seen the same sight. The sheep leave their in-bye (enclosed fields) and head for their summer grazing on the Commons.

Hundreds of sheep passed – Welsh Mountains and Scotch Black faces

Chivied along by two Dartmoor horse riding shepherdesses

Nearly there

Job done for another year (well, at least getting the sheep to the Common).

And right beside the drove are the rhos pastures – Dartmoor’s very, very special wet meadows – the Shire without the Ringwraithes – heaven on earth if you don’t mind wet feet. This is my favourite place on the  moor. I have spent hours and hours here over the years – it is truely magical and it never disappoints.

Marsh fritillary – one of our rarest species – I saw 20 today

And small pearl bordered fritillary – also very rare and threatened

A spider on a cotton grass flower head

The exquisite flower of the Bog Bean

What a day – epic – never let anyone tell you Dartmoor is wrecked – it is fabulous and has a history, which you can see today, going back thousands of years.

A trip to Bryher – landscapes and birds

Went to Bryher yesterday – it is such a beautiful and rugged island – here are a few pictures.

This is Shipman Head at the north end of the island

And this is Hell Bay – it takes the full unimpeded force of a westerly gale

Thift flowering beside Popplestone Bay

A maze beside Popplestone Bay

Rock sculture

Steve enjoying the view and snapping a few shots

There was a flock of four Dunlin on the Pool

They were very tame which implies they hadn’t seen people before

Birds from the wilderness

Smart bird in summer plumage

A whimbrel amongst the thrift

On its way to breed in the far north on the tundra

A stonechat

A smart male

Wrens are perhaps the commonest bird on the Islands

Bryher is well worth a visit – you won’t be disappointed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A day on St Agnes

Spent the day on St Agnes yesterday

On the tripper boat …

Gugh Bar joins At Agnes with Gugh – the most famous tombolo in the world!

Pleased to see a small colony of kittiwakes surviving on Gugh – Britain’s most endangered seabird as a result of climate change and rising ocean temperatures.

Looking over to Gugh

The Devil’s Punchbowl on Wingletang Down

Cuckoo on Wingletang Down

The Nag’s Head

Male wheatear –  a passage migrant on Scilly

A colony of fulmar

An unnamed granite outcrop on Castella Down

Male Stonechat

The Troytown maze

A rock pipit

Pretty much my favourite island